ALS 500 & 600 #5 (Spring 2)

Welcome to ALS 500 & 600!  You are in the right place if you are looking for your extensive listening opportunities.  If you are not an ALS 500 or 600 student that’s ok – you can still attend these events if you would like.  If you are an ALS 500 or 600 student, you need to attend one of the events from the list below.  After you attend one of these events, write a brief summary and reaction – you can ask your teacher if you have any questions about this.  This is the FIFTH Extensive Listening Log opportunity of the session – make sure you talk to your teacher about when your ELL is due.

 1) Wisconsin Film Festival Presents: Food Patriots (2013)

Jeff Spitz’s film documents the story of his own family and how, after his son’s bout with a serious food-derived illness, they became involved in a grassroots movement to rid our food of antibiotics and genetic modifications. Entertaining, humorous, and informative, this is a film to see before you take your next trip to the grocery store.

This event is not free!

When: Thursday, April 3rd @ 6:30pm

Location: The Marquee, Union South

2) Memories of Resistance in Brazil: Reflections on Student Opposition, 50 Years after the Golpe de Estado

Victoria Langland, Associate Professor of History, University of Michigan. Part of a two-day symposium, “Brazil and Human Rights Reconsidered: Politics, Culture and Dictatorship, 50 Years after the 1964 Coup.”

When: Thursday, April 3rd @ 7pm

Location: Room 335 Pyle Center

3) Cheese is Alive!: Regulating the Microbial Ecologies of Artisanal Cheese

Heather Paxson (MIT) and and a panel of commentators consider the debates over the regulation of unpasteurized milk cheeses. Commentators include Mark Jonson of the Center for Dairy Research, and Andy Hatch, UW alum and new owner of Uplands Cheese. Followed by cheese sampling.

When: Thursday, April 3rd @ 7pm

Location: De Luca Forum, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery

4) China’s Transition to a Consumption-Based Economy

The panel of professors speaking at this year’s event consists of Professor James Walker, who will speak out the effects of internal migration on China’s economy; Professor Nancy Wong, who will talk about consumer culture in China; Professor Ian Coxhead, who will discuss the challenges China faces as a middle income country; and Professor Guanming Shi, who will talk about patent policies in China and the US. A panel discussion at 4:30 pm with all four speakers will conclude the event.

When: Friday, April 4th @ 2pm

Location: Plenary Room, Grainger Hall

5) Yi-Fu Tuan Lecture Series: A final talk by Yi-Fu Tuan

Space, Place, Nature: One Last Look

I have been writing about “Space, Place, and Nature” for at least three decades. You’d think I am now able to say something about them that is authoritative, if not definitive. But–thank God!–not at all. “Space” and “place,” yes, I can sound professorial, but “nature” and “what is reality” completely elude me, making me feel like a beginner. And it is as a beginner that I wish to make this farewell speech to colleagues in Science Hall.

When: Friday, April 4th @ 3:30pm

Location: Room 180 Science Hall

6) SoundWaves: Could You Repeat That? Repetition in Science and Music

SoundWaves combines scientific lectures about the world with live classical music performances. Each event revolves around a theme, exploring it first from many scientific angles and then through the lens of music. The program concludes with a live performance of music related to the evening’s theme. The science and music lectures are delivered using language that the curious layman can understand, with a minimum of jargon and formulas.

When: Friday, April 4th @ 7pm

Location: Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery

7) Unemployment and Inequality: A Path Forward

Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic Policy and Research, a progressive think tank in Washington, DC., was one of the earliest economists to foresee the housing bubble and predict the recession of 2008. His recently completed an e-book with a colleague titled, ‘Getting Back to Full Employment: A Better Bargain for Working People”, available at www.cepr.net.

When: Friday, April 4th @ 7:30pm

Location: 2650 Mosse Humanities Building

8) Saturday Science @ Discovery: UW-Madison Science Expeditions

This monthly series consists of free science exploration and education programs aimed at families and learners of all ages.  Check out their Website! http://discovery.wisc.edu/SaturdayScience
When: Saturday, April 5th @ 10am
Location: Town Center, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery

9) Town Center Tour

The guided tour lasts approximately 45 minutes and covers the Town Center of the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery. The tour is free and open to the public, and no reservation is required. Please meet at the welcome desk on the first floor.
When: Saturday, April 5th @ 11am
Location: Town Center, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery

10) Language Matters: Wisconsin and the World

This lecture will discuss the topic of bilingualism.  A Fountain of Cognitive Youth? The Effects of Bilingual Proficiencies on Cognitive Aging, Catherine Stafford, Department of Spanish and Portuguese
When: Monday, April 7th @ 5pm
Location: Wisconsin Idea room, Education Building

11) Wednesday Nite @ the Lab

Come experience science as exploring the unknown every week at Wednesday Nite @ the Lab. Discover the latest from UW-Madison researchers as they share the saga of their investigations and inventions that are changing how we look at life and how we lead our lives. Join the discussion as learners of all ages explore more and share their ideas, questions and insights.
When: Wednesday, April 9th @ 7pm

12) Imagining Possible Worlds: Panel with sic-fi author, Kim Stanley Robinson

WID, the Center for Humanities and To the Best of Our Knowledge present Imaging Possible Worlds, a conversation about literature, science and the future. Renowned science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson, WID Director David Krakauer, English Professor Monique Allewaert and TTBOOK Producer and WID Distinguished Scholar Steve Paulson will explore how humanists, scientists and artists bring distinct but overlapping approaches to universal questions about shared global interests.
When: Wednesday, April 9th @ 7:30pm
Location: Discovery Building, 330 N. Orchard St.
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